CHIROT ZERO ZINE--ANNOUNCING NEW BLOG

Dear Followers, Friends, fellow Workers:

I have just begun a new blog/zine called
Chirot Zero Zine A Heap of Rubble--
Anarkeyology of hand eye ear notations
---
http://chirotzerozine.blogspot.com
the blog is more exusively concerned than this one with presenting essays, reviews (inc. "bad reviews") , Visual Poetry, Sound Poetry, Event Scores, Manifestos, Manifotofestos, rantin' & raving, rock'roll, music all sorts--by myself and others--if you are interested in being a contributor, please feel free to contact me at david.chirot@gmail.com
as with this blog, the arts are investigated as a part of rather than apart from the historical, economic, political actualities of yesterday, today, & tomorrow
as with al my blogs--
contributions in any language are welcome

Free Leonard Peltier

Free Leonard Peltier
The government under pretext of security and progress, liberated us from our land, resources, culture, dignity and future. They violated every treaty they ever made with us. I use the word “liberated” loosely and sarcastically, in the same vein that I view the use of the words “collateral damage” when they kill innocent men, women and children. They describe people defending their homelands as terrorists, savages and hostiles . . . My words reach out to the non-Indian: Look now before it is too late—see what is being done to others in your name and see what destruction you sanction when you say nothing. --Leonard Peltier, Annual Message January 2004 (Leonard Peltier is now serving 31st year as an internationally recognized Political Prisoner of the United States Government)

Injustice Continues: Leonard Peltier Again Denied Parole

# Injustice continues: Leonard Peltier denied parole‎ - By Mahtowin A wave of outrage swept the progressive community worldwide at the news that Native political prisoner Leonard Peltier was denied parole on Aug. ... Workers World - 2 related articles » US denies parole to American Indian activist Leonard Peltier‎ - AFP - 312 related articles » # Free Leonard Peltier 2009 PRISON WRITINGS...My Life Is My Sun Dance Leonard Peltier © 1999. # Prison Writings: My Life Is My Sun Dance - by Leonard Peltier, Harvey Arden - 2000 - Biography & Autobiography - 272 pages Edited by Harvey Arden, with an Introduction by Chief Arvol Looking Horse, and a Preface by former Attorney General Ramsey Clark. In 1977, Leonard Peltier... books.google.com/books?isbn=0312263805... - # Leonard Peltier, American Indian Activist, Denied Parole And Won't ... Aug 21, 2009 ... BISMARCK, ND — American Indian activist Leonard Peltier, imprisoned since 1977 for the deaths of two FBI agents, has been denied parole ... www.huffingtonpost.com/.../leonard-peltier-american_n_265764.html - Cached - Similar - #

Gaza--War Crime: Collective Punishment of 1.5 Million Persons--Recognized as "The World's Largest Concentration Camp"

Number of Iraquis Killed Since USA 2003 Invasion began

Just Foreign Policy Iraqi Death Estimator

US & International Personnel losses in Iraq &Afghanistan; Costs of the 2 Wars to US


Number of U.S. Military Personnel Sacrificed (Officially acknowledged) In America's War On Iraq: 4,667
icasualties.org/oif/

Number Of International Occupation Force Troops Slaughtered In Afghanistan : 1,453
http://icasualties.org/oef/


=

Cost of War in Iraq

$691,188,637,164

Cost of War in Afghanistan
$229,137,844,021

The cost in your community

www.nationalpriorities.org/index.php?option=com_wrapper&Itemid=182

flickr: DEATH FROM THIS WINDOW/DOORS OF GUANTANAMO--Essays, Links, Video-- US use of Torture

VISUAL POETRY/MAIL ART CALL Cracking World’s Walls & Codes Concrete & Virtual

Cracking World’s Walls & Codes Concrete & Virtual


VISUAL POETRY/MAIL ART CALL
No Sieges, Tortures, Starvation & Surveillance
GAZA-GUANTANAMO-ABU GHRAIB—THE GLOBE
Deadline/Fecha Limite: SinsLimite/ongoing
Size: No limit/Sin Limite
No Limit on Number of Works sent
No Limit on Number of Times New Works Are Sent
Documentation: on my blog
http://davidbaptistechirot.blogspot.com
Addresses: david.chirot@gmail.com
David Baptiste Chirot
740 N 29 #108
Milwaukee, WI 53208
USA

Miss Universe Visits Guantanamo: 'A Loooot Of Fun!'



Miss Universe Visits Guantanamo: 'A Loooot Of Fun!'


The current 'Miss Universe' Dayana Mendoza (formerly Miss Venezuela) and 'Miss America' Crystal Stewart visited US troops stationed in Guantanamo Bay on March 20th, the New York Times reports. Here's Mendoza's account of the visit from her pageant blog last Friday. She says the trip "was a loooot of fun!"

This week, Guantánamo!!! It was an incredible experience...All the guys from the Army were amazing with us. We visited the Detainees camps and we saw the jails, where they shower, how the recreate themselves with movies, classes of art, books. It was very interesting. We took a ride with the Marines around the land to see the division of Gitmo and Cuba while they were informed us with a little bit of history.


The water in Guantánamo Bay is soooo beautiful! It was unbelievable, we were able to enjoy it for at least an hour. We went to the glass beach, and realized the name of it comes from the little pieces of broken glass from hundred of years ago. It is pretty to see all the colors shining with the sun. That day we met a beautiful lady named Rebeca who does wonders with the glasses from the beach. She creates jewelry with it and of course I bought a necklace from her that will remind me of Guantánamo Bay :)

I didn't want to leave, it was such a relaxing place, so calm and beautiful.

Thursday, July 17, 2008

Portugal in an Uproar Over Pessoa’s Papers

Portugal in an Uproar Over Pessoa's Papers

Thursday July 3, 2008
With his three heteronyms, imaginary brother poets, Fernando Pessoa was a literary movement all by himself. When he died in 1935, he left behind a whole steamer trunk full of literary work, and he has since become the most celebrated modern poet in Portugal. Now the Portuguese National Library and Pessoa's heirs are fighting over the family's intention to sell his unpublished papers:
from The Independent (UK):
"Portugal angry over sale of papers 'vital to nation's literary heritage'," by Elizabeth Nash in Madrid
"A row has broken out in Portugal's literary world over plans by heirs of the nation's most famous modern poet, Fernando Pessoa, to auction his unpublished manuscripts and letters.... Pessoa's nephews favour selling the material, piece by piece. Scholars say that would make a definitive study of the poet's unpublished work impossible."
More on Fernando Pessoa:
Our introduction, Fernando Pessoa – Poet as Poetry
His poem "Autopsychography" in one of its many, many English translations


Time for vacation? WIN what you need. Enter Now!

"Help Me!! Help Me!! I" nterrogation Video of Teenage Boy at Guantanamo

NEWS YOU WON'T FIND ON CNN

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Help Me - Help Me - Help Me

 

Another proud moment in US history

 

Omar Kahdr's Interrogation Video From Guantanamo.

 Kahdr held in Concentration Camp for 5 years without charge.

A Canadian citizen born in Toronto, he is the youngest prisoner held in extrajudicial detention by the United States and has been frequently referred to as a child soldier. The only Western citizen remaining in Guantanamo, Khadr is unique in that Canada has refused to seek extradition or repatriation despite the urgings of Amnesty International, UNICEF, the Canadian Bar Association and other prominent organisations.

Khadr is the only Guantanamo detainee who has faced a judge and who is not boycotting the military tribunals, and has spent six years in the Guantanamo Bay detention camps charged with war crimes and providing support to terrorism after allegedly throwing a grenade that killed a US soldier.

In February 2008, the Pentagon accidentally released documents that revealed that although Khadr was present during the firefight, there was no other evidence that he had thrown the grenade. In fact, military officials had originally reported that another of the surviving militants had thrown the grenade just before being killed.

 

Posted 15/07/08


 

 

 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/7507991.stm

Click on "comments" below to read or post comments

15/07/08  -- -- TORONTO -- Lawyers for a Canadian prisoner at Guantanamo Bay released excerpts of videotaped interrogations Tuesday, providing a first-ever glimpse into the secretive world of questioning enemy combatants at the isolated U.S. prison in Cuba.
The 10 minutes of video _ selected by Omar Khadr's Canadian lawyers from more than seven hours of footage recorded by a camera hidden in a vent _ shows a 16-year-old Khadr weeping, his face buried in his hands, during the 2003 interrogation that took place over four days.
The video, created by U.S. government agents and originally marked as secret, provides insight into the effects of prolonged interrogation and detention on the Guantanamo prisoner.
A Canadian Security Intelligence Services agent in the video grills Khadr about events leading up to his capture as an enemy combatant when he was 15. Khadr, a Canadian citizen, is accused of throwing a grenade that killed a U.S. soldier during a 2002 firefight in Afghanistan. He was arrested after he was found in the rubble of a bombed-out compound _ badly wounded and near death.
At one point in the interrogation, Khadr pulls off his orange prisoner shirt and shows the wounds he sustained in the firefight. He complains he can't move his arms and says he had requested, but hadn't received, proper medical attention.
"They look like they're healing well to me," the agent says of the injuries.
"No, I'm not. You're not here (at Guantanamo)," Khadr says.
The agent later accuses Khadr of using his injuries and emotional state to avoid the interrogation.
"No, you don't care about me," Khadr says.
Khadr also tells his interrogator that he was tortured while at the U.S. military detention center at the Bagram air base in Afghanistan, where he was first detained after his arrest in 2002.
Later on in the tape, a distraught Khadr is seen rocking, his face in his hands.
"Help me," he sobs repeatedly in despair.
On the final day, the agent tells Khadr that he was "very disappointed" in how Khadr had behaved, and tries to impress upon him that he should cooperate.
Khadr says he wants to go back to Canada.
"There's not anything I can do about that," the agent says.
The video is believed to be the first footage shown of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service in action during its 24-year history, offering an unprecedented glimpse into its interrogation strategies.
The video was made public under Canadian court orders, and released by Alberta-based lawyers Nathan Whitling and Dennis Edney a week after intelligence reports made public last week showed Khadr was abused in detention at the U.S. naval base-turned-prison on the tip of Cuba.
A Department of Foreign Affairs report said Canadian official Jim Gould visited Khadr in 2004 and was told by the American military that the detainee was moved every three hours to different cells to deprive him of sleep and familiar cell mates.
The report also says Khadr was placed in isolation for up to three weeks and then interviewed again.
Whitling and Edney released the video with hopes that public reaction to the footage will prompt Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper to lobby for his repatriation.
"We hope that the Canadian government will finally come to recognize that the so-called legal process that has been put in place to deal with Omar Khadr's situation is grossly unfair and abusive," Whitling said. "It's not appropriate to simply allow this process to run its course."

 

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[BBC] Guantanamo Bay video in full--Interrogation of 16 yearold boy

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/7507991.stm

**

The Colour of Water – Thirst in the Palestinian Territories



http://www.palestinemonitor.org/spip/spip.php?article526

The Colour of Water – Thirst in the Palestinian Territories
Maan News
16 July 2008

By Alice Gray

This article was first published in the magazine of the YMCA/YWCA
Joint Advocacy Initiative, East Jerusalem.

"Who says water has no colour, flavour or smell? Water does have a
colour that reveals itself in the unfolding of thirst........And water
has the flavour of water, and a fragrance that is the scent of the
afternoon breeze blown from a field with full ears of wheat waving in
a luminous expanse strewn like the flickering spots of light left by
the wings of a small sparrow fluttering low."

- Mahmoud Darwish, Memory for Forgetfulness, August, Beirut, 1982.

"Water is fundamental for life and health. The human right to water is
indispensable for leading a healthy life in human dignity. It is a pre-
requisite to the realization of all other human rights."

- United Nations Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.

Palestinians queue for pure water supplied by the UN in Gaza

The water crisis has started early this year in the Palestinian
Territories.

In scores of towns and villages throughout the West Bank and Gaza
Strip, people listen eagerly for the gurgle of water in pipelines, and
turn on their taps with trepidation, watching anxiously for the first
drops to appear, waiting to see if they turn into a stream, or
splutter and gurgle to nothing after a few seconds. Others watch and
wait for the arrival of water tankers, transporting the life-giving
liquid to them from distant sources across an obstacle course of road
blocks, checkpoints and military closures put in place by the Israeli
Authorities, an inherent feature of their ongoing military occupation
and colonization of the Palestinian Territories.

This is a particularly hard summer for Palestinians in the West Bank
and Gaza. Even in normal years, the majority of Palestinians suffer
from problems with their water supply. According to the Palestinian
Water Authority, over 220,000 West Bank Palestinians are not connected
to a piped water network, instead relying on water tankers, harvested
rainwater and untreated natural springs for their water supply. All of
these sources are susceptible to contamination; according to the
Palestinian Medical Relief Committee, health problems associated with
poor water quality are common in Palestinian villages that rely on
them . In addition, cost is a huge issue for communities that are
forced to rely on tankered water which often costs 4 to 7 times as
much as water from the network.

Even in villages that are connected to the network, water supply is
neither continuous nor reliable. According to the Water, Sanitation
and Hygiene Monitoring Project only 46% of West Bank communities
receive full coverage from the water network. The rest suffer
interruptions in supply that can last from a few hours to several
weeks or even months.

In the Gaza Strip, while the vast majority of the population is
connected to the water network, there is an enormous problem with
water quality. A shocking 90% of water supplied to Gazans does not
meet World Health Organization drinking water standards. This is due
to the degradation of the Gaza Aquifer, the sole source of drinking
water for Gaza's population, which quite simply does not contain
sufficient water to satisfy the demands of Gaza's swollen population,
over 70% of whom are registered refugees. The level of the aquifer is
dropping, year by year, and salt water from the adjacent Mediterranean
Sea is seeping in, threatening to render the entire aquifer unusable
if no measures are taken to reverse the situation. Interruptions in
water supply for Gaza's residents come as a result of Israeli military
operations and restrictions in the entry of goods into Gaza, that
damage water infrastructure, or that interfere with the supply of
electricity to power wells and pumping stations.

In normal years, as the furnace-hot Middle Eastern summer wears on,
interruptions in water supply for Palestinians become more and more
frequent, as natural water reserves run low and pressure in the water
network drops. The Israeli authorities, who control a large proportion
of key water pipelines in the West Bank, close valves to Palestinian
villages in order to ensure that the supply to Israeli settlements,
supplied via the same network, remains constant . Military operations
in Gaza smash water infrastructure and close down power stations,
halting water supply to tens of thousands of people. Rainwater,
captured during the winter and stored in cisterns against just such
emergencies begins to dwindle, and Palestinians wait, gasping, for the
first rain since spring to fall on the parched land, restoring the
level of underground aquifers, lakes, rivers and cisterns, turning the
austerely barren hillsides green once more.

Sprinklers over green lawns

Palestinians wait, but on the other side of the Wall, in Israel and in
Israeli settlements in the West Bank, it is another story. Sprinklers
play over green lawns, flowers bloom in well-kept gardens, children
play in swimming pools, people are able to take two showers a day, and
for the vast majority, the water crisis does not exist, or exists only
in an abstract sense, as a hazy awareness that Israel is located in
one of the most arid regions on earth. The reality of water scarcity
that haunts the Palestinians scarcely touches most Israelis, and in
addition, Israel is able to maintain a multi-billion dollar
agricultural sector, that exports water intensive crops (such as
avocados, citrus fruits and herbs) to Europe, an activity that
essentially amounts to exporting water.

It seems strange that such different realities should exist within
such a small geographic area. Stranger yet when one realizes that both
the Israeli and Palestinian populations draw their water from the same
three major resources, the Mountain Aquifer, the Coastal Aquifer and
the Jordan River, which straddle the borders of Israel and the
Palestinian Territories. Surely if there is a water crisis, everyone
should feel it? Yet every year, Palestinians suffer water shortage,
and the majority of Israelis (with the notable exception of the
Bedouin) do not.

Manufactured crisis

The somewhat unpalatable truth of the matter is that every year, a
water crisis is manufactured in the Palestinian Territories due to
Israeli monopolization of water resources and hampering of Palestinian
water development. The total yield of the Mountain Aquifer, the
Coastal Aquifer and the Jordan River system (the three main water
resources for Palestinians and Israelis) is approximately 1720 million
cubic metres of water per year on an average year, of which Israel
uses some 1444 million cubic metres, leaving a mere 275 million cubic
metres for the Palestinians . Despite the aridity of the region, it is
a fact that there is enough water available in Israel and the
Palestinian Territories for everyone to have the minimum supply
recommended by the World Health Organization to maintain a decent
standard of living: 100 litres per person per day. Many Palestinians
receive far below this amount. In some areas the average supply is as
little as 10 litres per person per day during the hot months of the
summer, even in years of relative water abundance .

This year is not an average year. This year is the worst drought the
area has seen this decade. This year crops and trees are wilting and
dying in the fields, and shepherds are struggling to find water for
their livestock. According to a UN report issued in January, the
rainfall over the Palestinian Territories this past winter was a mere
26% of the inter-annual average, dipping as low as 13% in the Hebron
region. This year even the Israelis are worried. In May, Uri Shani,
the Director of the Israeli Water Authority warned that the level of
the Sea of Galilee (known as Lake Kinneret to the Israelis and Lake
Tiberias to the Arabs) will drop below its 'red-line' this summer,
making it unsafe to continue pumping water from this resource at the
rate it is normally pumped.

The Sea of Galilee is part of the Jordan River System and normally
supplies a massive 570 million cubic metres of water per year to
Israelis , the majority of which is pumped south via the Israeli
National Water carrier to supply towns and farms in the middle and
south of the country. If this supply is reduced, it is most likely
that Israeli farmers will be the ones who are primarily affected,
since the Israeli agricultural sector is the largest water user in the
country and the Water Authority is likely to cut water quotas to
farmers in order to protect domestic supply. In addition to that, the
Water Authority may protect ordinary Israelis from feeling the effect
of the water shortage by making up the shortfall in domestic water
supply from other resources, quite possibly at the expense of already
struggling Palestinians.

Oslo

At present, Palestinian water rights have been acknowledged by Israel,
but not quantified, leaving Palestinians vulnerable to water
deprivation. In 1995, a temporary agreement was made (the Oslo Interim
Agreement) stipulating that each side would maintain current
utilization of the shared Mountain Aquifer until the Permanent Status
Negotiations could take place – this meant that Israelis got to use
80% of the water, whilst Palestinians were guaranteed the use of just
20% of this resource. This skewed utilization was in itself a result
of Israeli restriction of Palestinian water development since the
occupation began in 1967, when Israel proclaimed all water resources
to be Israeli State property, fixed pumping quotas on wells, and
created a permitting system that stifled water development for
Palestinians. According to the Oslo agreement, Palestinians should
also have been allowed to develop an additional supply of up to 80
million cubic metres of water from sources inside the West Bank, to
help alleviate their immediate water shortage.

Even with the additional allowance, the amount of water allotted to
Palestinians was barely enough to meet their basic needs, made no
allowance for development of the agricultural sector, and took no
account of population growth in the medium to long term. The Final
Status Negotiations should have been concluded within 5 years of the
Interim Agreement. However, to this day they have not taken place, and
improvements in the water situation for many needy Palestinian
communities have remained elusive.

Obstacles to aid

Less than half the promised 80 million cubic metres of additional
water supply has been developed, despite high levels of international
funding for Palestinian water development. One major reason for this
is that the Oslo Agreement allows Israelis a veto over Palestinian
development projects; and in addition creates a lengthy, convoluted
and bureaucratic permitting system that many local and international
NGOs working in the field have found impossible to negotiate. 60% of
the land mass of the West Bank remains under full Israeli control, and
projects in these areas require additional permits from Israeli
Authorities. Nearly all of the Palestinian communities who are not
connected to the water network (comprising over 220,000 people) are in
Israeli controlled areas .

Efforts to help these people have consistently been hampered and
derailed over the course of the 13 years since the signing of the Oslo
Agreement. For example, this year in April, the British charity Oxfam
who had been involved in two major water projects in the water scarce
Hebron governorate, closed their office in the area due to the
impossibility of obtaining permits for their work . Due to the ongoing
frustration of being unable to implement projects due to lack of
permits and the wastage of time and money that this was causing, the
charity has been forced to give up on their much needed efforts to
bring water to the parched communities of south Hebron, who are among
the neediest in the West Bank.

Israeli company in control

As Palestinians have been unable to gain access to sufficient
resources of their own, over the years, they have increasingly come to
depend on purchasing water from the Israeli water company, Mekorot.
Last year, Palestinians purchased 43.9 million cubic metres of water
from Mekorot, constituting over 50% of the domestic water supply for
the West Bank. This water is under no guarantee (with the exception of
5 million cubic metres that are transferred to Gaza) – if Mekorot
decides not to sell it to Palestinians, there is no binding agreement
that can force them to do so. If this water is wanted inside Israel,
for domestic use, for agriculture or for industry, it may be
transferred to those uses, leaving Palestinians thirsty.

Due to the drought this year, there is great concern that this is what
will happen. So far, water cut-offs that would normally start
happening in July have occurred in May, and the situation looks set to
deteriorate as the heat intensifies. Mekorot currently directly
controls the water supply to 250 Palestinian communities in the West
Bank, who are supplied via the same network that serves Israeli
settlements. In past years the valves supplying Palestinian villages,
many of which are located inside the settlements themselves, have been
closed on multiple occasions through the summer months, in order to
ensure that there is enough pressure in the water network to allow a
constant supply of water to the settlements, where water sprinklers
continue to play over green lawns in sharp contrast to the world of
dust and thirst that nearby Palestinian communities endure as a
consequence.

In June, the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Monitoring Project issued a
report on severe reductions in water supply to several villages in the
Nablus governorate that are normally supplied by Mekorot. Currently
their water supply is just 15% of the normal rate, forcing them to buy
additional supplies from water tankers at a cost of 20 shekels per
cubic metre (more than 5 times the price of piped water). Many
families are already suffering from economic crisis, many have seen
their land confiscated and lost their livelihoods in the agricultural
sector as a result of the Israeli Occupation, many have been unable to
find alternative employment. A lot of people can ill afford this
additional expense and will instead reduce their consumption of water
to unsafe levels which impact on their health and that of their
children.

Gaza on the brink

Violations of the right to water are not limited to the West Bank.
This year the Gaza Strip is under an ongoing embargo that restricts
supplies of fuel to power water pumping stations and sewage works, and
the supply of spare parts to maintain the water and wastewater
networks. On 21 January 2008, the Palestinian Water Authority
acknowledged that 40 percent of the houses in the Gaza Strip had no
running water and the following day reports emerged that sewage was
flooding the streets . In March, reports on the situation from Red
Cross workers in the area warned that the sanitation crisis was 'bad
and getting worse'. As the summer wears on and the heat builds, the
suffering caused by insufficient and contaminated water supplies and
festering sewage lying close to human habitations is likely to become
more acute as Israel's vicelike grip on Gaza continues.

The situation that is being created in Gaza is forcing international
aid to shift more and more towards emergency assistance, and away from
attempts to tackle the underlying problem of environmental degradation
that may ultimately cause the destruction of the Gaza Aquifer to the
extent that there is no longer any fresh water left to supply Gaza's
population. The same is true of the West Bank, where due to the
difficult development situation, funders are concentrating more and
more on immediate assistance to water scarce communities through
helping to provide tankered water at affordable prices or building
cisterns, rather than addressing the issue of water insecurity and
insufficient infrastructure that is creating dependency and
vulnerability in the first place, and at the same time contributing to
the destruction of the Palestinian environment.

Right to water

The truth is that until Palestinian water rights are recognized and
protected, and until restrictions on Palestinian development are
lifted, every year Palestinians will learn to know the colour of water
all too well, to feel the throat-cracking pinch of thirst, and to fear
for the viability of their future as they thirst in the midst of
plenty in a crisis that has been created for them by their occupiers.
For as long as the Israeli government is allowed, by the people of
Israel and by the international community, to value the welfare of
Jews over that of Arabs and to value the profit from its agricultural
sector over the human rights of Palestinians, this blatant injustice,
this denial of water, that most fundamental of life-giving resources,
the pre-requisite for realizing all other human rights, will go on.

Alice Gray is a co-founder of LifeSource, an initiative to stimulate
grassroots movements for water access and sustainability in the
Palestinian Territories and Israel. To learn more about the water
situation in the region, please visit the LifeSource website: www.lifesource.ps

.

i Dr Ghassan Hamdan, Palestinian Medical Relief Committee, Personal
Communication, May 2008.

ii WaSH MP (2005) Water for Life: Continued Israeli Assault on
Palestinian Water, Sanitation and Hygiene during the Intifada. Water,
Sanitation and Hygiene Monitoring Program.

iii Israeli Hydrological Service (2003), Evolution of the Exploitation
and State of Israel's Water Sources until Autumn 2003; Palestinian
Central Bureau of Statistics (2008) Annual Available Water Quantity in
the Palestinian Territory by Region and Source in 2006.

iv PWA (2005) Water Supply in the West Bank, 2005. Directorate General
of Resources and Planning, Palestinian Water Authority.

v FAO and OCHA (2008) Drought: the latest blow to herding livelihoods.
United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, United Nations
Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. Jerusalem,
January 23rd, 2008.

vi Hillel Fendel (2008) Israeli Water Authority Director: Crisis
expected in July. Israel National News (www.IsraelNN.com), May 18th
2008.

vii Israeli Hydrological Service (2003), Evolution of the Exploitation
and State of Israel's Water Sources until Autumn 2003

viii Yousef Awayes, Palestinian Water Authority, Personal
Communication, May 2008.

ix Michael Bailey, Oxfam, Personal Communication, March 2008.

x WaSH MP (2004, 2005, 2006) Water for Life reports. Water, Sanitation
and Hygiene Monitoring Program.

xi COHRE (2008) Hostage to Politics: The impact of sanctions and the
blockade on the human right to water and sanitation in Gaza. Centre on
Housing Right and Evictions.

xii Ron Taylor (2008) Gaza: "Bad and getting worse". LifeSource News,
www.lifesource.ps
.
Follow-up of the site's activity
Maan News
16 July 2008

By Alice Gray

This article was first published in the magazine of the YMCA/YWCA
Joint Advocacy Initiative, East Jerusalem.

"Who says water has no colour, flavour or smell? Water does have a
colour that reveals itself in the unfolding of thirst........And water
has the flavour of water, and a fragrance that is the scent of the
afternoon breeze blown from a field with full ears of wheat waving in
a luminous expanse strewn like the flickering spots of light left by
the wings of a small sparrow fluttering low."

- Mahmoud Darwish, Memory for Forgetfulness, August, Beirut, 1982.

"Water is fundamental for life and health. The human right to water is
indispensable for leading a healthy life in human dignity. It is a pre-
requisite to the realization of all other human rights."

- United Nations Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.

Palestinians queue for pure water supplied by the UN in Gaza

The water crisis has started early this year in the Palestinian
Territories.

In scores of towns and villages throughout the West Bank and Gaza
Strip, people listen eagerly for the gurgle of water in pipelines, and
turn on their taps with trepidation, watching anxiously for the first
drops to appear, waiting to see if they turn into a stream, or
splutter and gurgle to nothing after a few seconds. Others watch and
wait for the arrival of water tankers, transporting the life-giving
liquid to them from distant sources across an obstacle course of road
blocks, checkpoints and military closures put in place by the Israeli
Authorities, an inherent feature of their ongoing military occupation
and colonization of the Palestinian Territories.

This is a particularly hard summer for Palestinians in the West Bank
and Gaza. Even in normal years, the majority of Palestinians suffer
from problems with their water supply. According to the Palestinian
Water Authority, over 220,000 West Bank Palestinians are not connected
to a piped water network, instead relying on water tankers, harvested
rainwater and untreated natural springs for their water supply. All of
these sources are susceptible to contamination; according to the
Palestinian Medical Relief Committee, health problems associated with
poor water quality are common in Palestinian villages that rely on
them . In addition, cost is a huge issue for communities that are
forced to rely on tankered water which often costs 4 to 7 times as
much as water from the network.

Even in villages that are connected to the network, water supply is
neither continuous nor reliable. According to the Water, Sanitation
and Hygiene Monitoring Project only 46% of West Bank communities
receive full coverage from the water network. The rest suffer
interruptions in supply that can last from a few hours to several
weeks or even months.

In the Gaza Strip, while the vast majority of the population is
connected to the water network, there is an enormous problem with
water quality. A shocking 90% of water supplied to Gazans does not
meet World Health Organization drinking water standards. This is due
to the degradation of the Gaza Aquifer, the sole source of drinking
water for Gaza's population, which quite simply does not contain
sufficient water to satisfy the demands of Gaza's swollen population,
over 70% of whom are registered refugees. The level of the aquifer is
dropping, year by year, and salt water from the adjacent Mediterranean
Sea is seeping in, threatening to render the entire aquifer unusable
if no measures are taken to reverse the situation. Interruptions in
water supply for Gaza's residents come as a result of Israeli military
operations and restrictions in the entry of goods into Gaza, that
damage water infrastructure, or that interfere with the supply of
electricity to power wells and pumping stations.

In normal years, as the furnace-hot Middle Eastern summer wears on,
interruptions in water supply for Palestinians become more and more
frequent, as natural water reserves run low and pressure in the water
network drops. The Israeli authorities, who control a large proportion
of key water pipelines in the West Bank, close valves to Palestinian
villages in order to ensure that the supply to Israeli settlements,
supplied via the same network, remains constant . Military operations
in Gaza smash water infrastructure and close down power stations,
halting water supply to tens of thousands of people. Rainwater,
captured during the winter and stored in cisterns against just such
emergencies begins to dwindle, and Palestinians wait, gasping, for the
first rain since spring to fall on the parched land, restoring the
level of underground aquifers, lakes, rivers and cisterns, turning the
austerely barren hillsides green once more.

Sprinklers over green lawns

Palestinians wait, but on the other side of the Wall, in Israel and in
Israeli settlements in the West Bank, it is another story. Sprinklers
play over green lawns, flowers bloom in well-kept gardens, children
play in swimming pools, people are able to take two showers a day, and
for the vast majority, the water crisis does not exist, or exists only
in an abstract sense, as a hazy awareness that Israel is located in
one of the most arid regions on earth. The reality of water scarcity
that haunts the Palestinians scarcely touches most Israelis, and in
addition, Israel is able to maintain a multi-billion dollar
agricultural sector, that exports water intensive crops (such as
avocados, citrus fruits and herbs) to Europe, an activity that
essentially amounts to exporting water.

It seems strange that such different realities should exist within
such a small geographic area. Stranger yet when one realizes that both
the Israeli and Palestinian populations draw their water from the same
three major resources, the Mountain Aquifer, the Coastal Aquifer and
the Jordan River, which straddle the borders of Israel and the
Palestinian Territories. Surely if there is a water crisis, everyone
should feel it? Yet every year, Palestinians suffer water shortage,
and the majority of Israelis (with the notable exception of the
Bedouin) do not.

Manufactured crisis

The somewhat unpalatable truth of the matter is that every year, a
water crisis is manufactured in the Palestinian Territories due to
Israeli monopolization of water resources and hampering of Palestinian
water development. The total yield of the Mountain Aquifer, the
Coastal Aquifer and the Jordan River system (the three main water
resources for Palestinians and Israelis) is approximately 1720 million
cubic metres of water per year on an average year, of which Israel
uses some 1444 million cubic metres, leaving a mere 275 million cubic
metres for the Palestinians . Despite the aridity of the region, it is
a fact that there is enough water available in Israel and the
Palestinian Territories for everyone to have the minimum supply
recommended by the World Health Organization to maintain a decent
standard of living: 100 litres per person per day. Many Palestinians
receive far below this amount. In some areas the average supply is as
little as 10 litres per person per day during the hot months of the
summer, even in years of relative water abundance .

This year is not an average year. This year is the worst drought the
area has seen this decade. This year crops and trees are wilting and
dying in the fields, and shepherds are struggling to find water for
their livestock. According to a UN report issued in January, the
rainfall over the Palestinian Territories this past winter was a mere
26% of the inter-annual average, dipping as low as 13% in the Hebron
region. This year even the Israelis are worried. In May, Uri Shani,
the Director of the Israeli Water Authority warned that the level of
the Sea of Galilee (known as Lake Kinneret to the Israelis and Lake
Tiberias to the Arabs) will drop below its 'red-line' this summer,
making it unsafe to continue pumping water from this resource at the
rate it is normally pumped.

The Sea of Galilee is part of the Jordan River System and normally
supplies a massive 570 million cubic metres of water per year to
Israelis , the majority of which is pumped south via the Israeli
National Water carrier to supply towns and farms in the middle and
south of the country. If this supply is reduced, it is most likely
that Israeli farmers will be the ones who are primarily affected,
since the Israeli agricultural sector is the largest water user in the
country and the Water Authority is likely to cut water quotas to
farmers in order to protect domestic supply. In addition to that, the
Water Authority may protect ordinary Israelis from feeling the effect
of the water shortage by making up the shortfall in domestic water
supply from other resources, quite possibly at the expense of already
struggling Palestinians.

Oslo

At present, Palestinian water rights have been acknowledged by Israel,
but not quantified, leaving Palestinians vulnerable to water
deprivation. In 1995, a temporary agreement was made (the Oslo Interim
Agreement) stipulating that each side would maintain current
utilization of the shared Mountain Aquifer until the Permanent Status
Negotiations could take place – this meant that Israelis got to use
80% of the water, whilst Palestinians were guaranteed the use of just
20% of this resource. This skewed utilization was in itself a result
of Israeli restriction of Palestinian water development since the
occupation began in 1967, when Israel proclaimed all water resources
to be Israeli State property, fixed pumping quotas on wells, and
created a permitting system that stifled water development for
Palestinians. According to the Oslo agreement, Palestinians should
also have been allowed to develop an additional supply of up to 80
million cubic metres of water from sources inside the West Bank, to
help alleviate their immediate water shortage.

Even with the additional allowance, the amount of water allotted to
Palestinians was barely enough to meet their basic needs, made no
allowance for development of the agricultural sector, and took no
account of population growth in the medium to long term. The Final
Status Negotiations should have been concluded within 5 years of the
Interim Agreement. However, to this day they have not taken place, and
improvements in the water situation for many needy Palestinian
communities have remained elusive.

Obstacles to aid

Less than half the promised 80 million cubic metres of additional
water supply has been developed, despite high levels of international
funding for Palestinian water development. One major reason for this
is that the Oslo Agreement allows Israelis a veto over Palestinian
development projects; and in addition creates a lengthy, convoluted
and bureaucratic permitting system that many local and international
NGOs working in the field have found impossible to negotiate. 60% of
the land mass of the West Bank remains under full Israeli control, and
projects in these areas require additional permits from Israeli
Authorities. Nearly all of the Palestinian communities who are not
connected to the water network (comprising over 220,000 people) are in
Israeli controlled areas .

Efforts to help these people have consistently been hampered and
derailed over the course of the 13 years since the signing of the Oslo
Agreement. For example, this year in April, the British charity Oxfam
who had been involved in two major water projects in the water scarce
Hebron governorate, closed their office in the area due to the
impossibility of obtaining permits for their work . Due to the ongoing
frustration of being unable to implement projects due to lack of
permits and the wastage of time and money that this was causing, the
charity has been forced to give up on their much needed efforts to
bring water to the parched communities of south Hebron, who are among
the neediest in the West Bank.

Israeli company in control

As Palestinians have been unable to gain access to sufficient
resources of their own, over the years, they have increasingly come to
depend on purchasing water from the Israeli water company, Mekorot.
Last year, Palestinians purchased 43.9 million cubic metres of water
from Mekorot, constituting over 50% of the domestic water supply for
the West Bank. This water is under no guarantee (with the exception of
5 million cubic metres that are transferred to Gaza) – if Mekorot
decides not to sell it to Palestinians, there is no binding agreement
that can force them to do so. If this water is wanted inside Israel,
for domestic use, for agriculture or for industry, it may be
transferred to those uses, leaving Palestinians thirsty.

Due to the drought this year, there is great concern that this is what
will happen. So far, water cut-offs that would normally start
happening in July have occurred in May, and the situation looks set to
deteriorate as the heat intensifies. Mekorot currently directly
controls the water supply to 250 Palestinian communities in the West
Bank, who are supplied via the same network that serves Israeli
settlements. In past years the valves supplying Palestinian villages,
many of which are located inside the settlements themselves, have been
closed on multiple occasions through the summer months, in order to
ensure that there is enough pressure in the water network to allow a
constant supply of water to the settlements, where water sprinklers
continue to play over green lawns in sharp contrast to the world of
dust and thirst that nearby Palestinian communities endure as a
consequence.

In June, the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Monitoring Project issued a
report on severe reductions in water supply to several villages in the
Nablus governorate that are normally supplied by Mekorot. Currently
their water supply is just 15% of the normal rate, forcing them to buy
additional supplies from water tankers at a cost of 20 shekels per
cubic metre (more than 5 times the price of piped water). Many
families are already suffering from economic crisis, many have seen
their land confiscated and lost their livelihoods in the agricultural
sector as a result of the Israeli Occupation, many have been unable to
find alternative employment. A lot of people can ill afford this
additional expense and will instead reduce their consumption of water
to unsafe levels which impact on their health and that of their
children.

Gaza on the brink

Violations of the right to water are not limited to the West Bank.
This year the Gaza Strip is under an ongoing embargo that restricts
supplies of fuel to power water pumping stations and sewage works, and
the supply of spare parts to maintain the water and wastewater
networks. On 21 January 2008, the Palestinian Water Authority
acknowledged that 40 percent of the houses in the Gaza Strip had no
running water and the following day reports emerged that sewage was
flooding the streets . In March, reports on the situation from Red
Cross workers in the area warned that the sanitation crisis was 'bad
and getting worse'. As the summer wears on and the heat builds, the
suffering caused by insufficient and contaminated water supplies and
festering sewage lying close to human habitations is likely to become
more acute as Israel's vicelike grip on Gaza continues.

The situation that is being created in Gaza is forcing international
aid to shift more and more towards emergency assistance, and away from
attempts to tackle the underlying problem of environmental degradation
that may ultimately cause the destruction of the Gaza Aquifer to the
extent that there is no longer any fresh water left to supply Gaza's
population. The same is true of the West Bank, where due to the
difficult development situation, funders are concentrating more and
more on immediate assistance to water scarce communities through
helping to provide tankered water at affordable prices or building
cisterns, rather than addressing the issue of water insecurity and
insufficient infrastructure that is creating dependency and
vulnerability in the first place, and at the same time contributing to
the destruction of the Palestinian environment.

Right to water

The truth is that until Palestinian water rights are recognized and
protected, and until restrictions on Palestinian development are
lifted, every year Palestinians will learn to know the colour of water
all too well, to feel the throat-cracking pinch of thirst, and to fear
for the viability of their future as they thirst in the midst of
plenty in a crisis that has been created for them by their occupiers.
For as long as the Israeli government is allowed, by the people of
Israel and by the international community, to value the welfare of
Jews over that of Arabs and to value the profit from its agricultural
sector over the human rights of Palestinians, this blatant injustice,
this denial of water, that most fundamental of life-giving resources,
the pre-requisite for realizing all other human rights, will go on.

Alice Gray is a co-founder of LifeSource, an initiative to stimulate
grassroots movements for water access and sustainability in the
Palestinian Territories and Israel. To learn more about the water
situation in the region, please visit the LifeSource website: www.lifesource.ps

.

i Dr Ghassan Hamdan, Palestinian Medical Relief Committee, Personal
Communication, May 2008.

ii WaSH MP (2005) Water for Life: Continued Israeli Assault on
Palestinian Water, Sanitation and Hygiene during the Intifada. Water,
Sanitation and Hygiene Monitoring Program.

iii Israeli Hydrological Service (2003), Evolution of the Exploitation
and State of Israel's Water Sources until Autumn 2003; Palestinian
Central Bureau of Statistics (2008) Annual Available Water Quantity in
the Palestinian Territory by Region and Source in 2006.

iv PWA (2005) Water Supply in the West Bank, 2005. Directorate General
of Resources and Planning, Palestinian Water Authority.

v FAO and OCHA (2008) Drought: the latest blow to herding livelihoods.
United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, United Nations
Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. Jerusalem,
January 23rd, 2008.

vi Hillel Fendel (2008) Israeli Water Authority Director: Crisis
expected in July. Israel National News (www.IsraelNN.com), May 18th
2008.

vii Israeli Hydrological Service (2003), Evolution of the Exploitation
and State of Israel's Water Sources until Autumn 2003

viii Yousef Awayes, Palestinian Water Authority, Personal
Communication, May 2008.

ix Michael Bailey, Oxfam, Personal Communication, March 2008.

x WaSH MP (2004, 2005, 2006) Water for Life reports. Water, Sanitation
and Hygiene Monitoring Program.

xi COHRE (2008) Hostage to Politics: The impact of sanctions and the
blockade on the human right to water and sanitation in Gaza. Centre on
Housing Right and Evictions.

xii Ron Taylor (2008) Gaza: "Bad and getting worse". LifeSource News,
www.lifesource.ps
.
Follow-up of the site's activity
------------------------------------

Tuesday, July 15, 2008

Shadows of Knight - Dark Side (Great song by the band that had first US hit version of Gloria)



The Shadows of Knight were from Chicago and made a few lps and some excellent singles.

Their major hit was with "Gloria"--in the US--
the original of that is by Them, the Irish band fronted by Van Morrison--

Monday, July 14, 2008

Alteration of Digital & Other Images for Propaganda--"Seeing is Believing" by Erroll Morris



(Actually the entire Iraq War and the buildup to it educates the world daily on image manipulation--
one of the greatest dangers of the Internet is the proliferation of altered images, faked news stories, disinformation deliberately mass circulated--
the one thing this can do is to help readers/viewers learn to discern between what are the actual images and stories, and which are the altered, faked, and fictional ones--
hopefully this op-ed by film maker/writer Errol Morris wil be of use--
If you search "Errol Morris on this blog, you'll find other of his writings that have been posted here from his series of writings primarily in the NY Times)

Photo-Op
Believing Is Seeing

By ERROL MORRIS
Published: July 13, 2008

NEWSPAPERS and blogs are once again filled with a story about a digitally altered photograph. A picture of missiles launched by Iran. A picture that purports to show four missiles being fired rather than the three shown in other photographs of the launching. Are we to infer that no missiles were launched? Or just three? Or maybe only two? Take several steps back. Are we being tricked into thinking that Iran is a bigger threat than it is?


Oddly enough, the effect of all this publicity — including this essay — is to draw further attention to the missiles. If the casual reader passed over them quickly when they first appeared on the front pages of American newspapers, the missiles are now more than ever firmly embedded in the popular imagination.

I have asked myself how this controversy over a photograph became international news. Clearly, there are many reasons. But at the center of them all is this question: Are we on the brink of another war? I remind myself that the war in Iraq started with bellicose posturing and photographs. At the United Nations, Colin Powell displayed several photographs of Iraqi sites showing incontrovertible evidence of weapons of mass destruction. Of course, we now know that this incontrovertible visual evidence was false. We don’t need advanced digital tools to mislead, to misdirect or to confuse. All we need is a willingness to uncritically believe.

The alteration of photos for propaganda purposes has been with us as long as photography itself; it is not an invention of the digital age. But while digitally altered photographs can easily fool the eye, they often leave telltale footprints that allow them to be unmasked as forgeries. There are many famous altered photographs, from a Matthew Brady photograph of Abraham Lincoln’s head composited on to John Calhoun’s body to the endlessly altered photographs from Soviet Russia. An entire book, “The Commissar Vanishes,” by David King, is devoted to Soviet whims about who should be included (or deleted) in photographs. In the series shown above, Stalin is accompanied by three officials, then two, then one, as they successively fall out of favor and are cropped and airbrushed into non-existence. (In the end, in a painting based on the photograph, he stands alone.) We understand Stalin’s intentions by removing comrades, but what is the purpose of these Iranian missile photographs? They are clearly altered. The question remains: Why, and to what end?

The government of Iran could not have created a more self-serving controversy. It has focused our attention on Iranian military might more than ever. What will we remember — the digital manipulation of this photograph or the missiles streaking into the sky with their contrails of smoke? Will we ask about essential details — the range or the payload of these weapons? All we are left with is a threat in visual form.

The photographs tell us little about the real threat of Iran. The danger here is not in three missiles versus four. We do not understand the intentions behind the photograph — real or digitally manipulated. Is it a threat? A warning? Or a bluff? All we really know about the photograph is that the government of Iran wanted to get the attention of the world, and it succeeded.

Errol Morris, a filmmaker, writes the “Zoom” column for The Times online.

From Brazil: Ver-O-Poema neste VerdeVagoMundo

Para Benedicto Monteiro neste Verde Vago Mundo.




  Um Ver-O-Poema para BENEDICTO MONTEIRO
Soberania territorial e direitos dos indígernas as terras ancestrais: Dois princípios indicissociáveis. - Por Edmilson Rodrigues
Amazônia  - Por Arnaldo Massari
Viagem ao Xingu- Por Braz Chediack
O Maestro Waldemar Henrique - Por  Flanklin Jorge
Vagalumes no vidro- por Marta Cosmo
Eu te disse mamae Rose - por Cláudio Portella
Quando se apregoava na cidade do Porto - por Humberto Pinho
Sem pena de ter - por Teres Tavares
Superfície - poema de Edmir Carvalho Bezerra
enquanto ela fala umas coisas...- a poesia de Cecília
Jasmim do cárcere - poema de Benny Flanklin
Poemas de Almandrade
Um gesto, simplesmente - poema de Alexandre Sansone
Desejos e mais poemas - a poesia de Frida
Poesia do real - por Ana Guimaraes
Uirapuru - a lenda, a música, a poesia
Açaí, sol e carimbó é no Pará

www.veropoema.net - Ver-O-Poema o site


www.veropoema.com.br
- BLOG LIVRE DO VER-O-POEMA

 
     

New Mail Art Calls-- convocatorias boek861 bn 130708





CONVOCATORIA

Haznos llegar tu pequeño homenaje al artista catalán Joan Brossa, en el décimo aniversario de su muerte.
'Si no pudiera escribir, en los momentos de euforia seria guerrillero, en los de pasividad prestidigitador. Ser poeta incluye las do cosas.' Joan Brossa.
J. Brossa incorpora dos de las tradiciones fundamentales de la poesía moderna, tal y como lo definió Octavio Paz en 'Los hijos del Limo' 1974:
'La magia y la política, la tradición hermética y la tradición revolucionaria. Joan Brossa siempre comparó la magia y el ilusionismo con la poesía. Fue un luchador contra todo lo que reprimía los anhelos de libertad espiritual y material.'

Título: Magia poética J. Brossa // Mida: máximo 12 x 18 cm. // Fecha límite: 4 de octubre de 2008. //

Dirección: Comicactiva, Joan Maragall 5-11, 3º 5º. 08397 Pineda de Mar, Barcelona. Catalunya / España

Organiza: Comicactiva S.C.G y GONG per la defensa dels drets humans. // Comisario de la convocatoria: Àngel S. Martínez

Todas las obras se expondrán durante el 10º 'Somriure para Chiapas' de Pineda de Mar, El Maresme.

Mail Art Announcement: Joan Brossa's poetic magic

ENGLISH
Send us your little hommage to the Catalan artist Joan Brossa, commemorating the tenth anniversary of his death.
"If I couldn't write, I'd be a warrior in the euphoric times, and a magician in the passive ones. Being a poet includes both of them." Joan Brossa.
J. Brossa incorporates two of the fondamental traditions of the modern poetry, in the way Octavio Paz defined it on 'Los hijos del Limo' (Limo's children), in 1974:
"Magic and politics, secretic tradition and revolutionary tradition. Joan Brossa always compared magic and illusionism with poetry. He fought against everything that repressed the desires of spiritual and material freedom."


Title: Poetic Magic J. Brossa // Size: 12x18 cm maximum // Deadline: October 4th 2008

Address: Comicactiva ; c/ Joan Maragall 5-11, 3r 5e. 08397 Pineda de Mar, Barcelona, Catalunya. // Organisation: Comicactiva S.C.G. and GONG defending the human rights. // Announcement commissioner: Ángel S. Martínez

Every work of art will be exhibited on the 10th "Somriure per Chiapas" (Smile for Chiapas) in Pineda de Mar, El Maresme.


copia y pasa / copy and pass








1

TRENES, VIAJES Y VAGONES

1

Esta es una llamada de Arte Postal sobre el tema de LOS TRENES y todo aquello que se le asocie.
Maquinas, vagones, señales, vías, boletos, etc.
Las técnicas son libres y las medidas desde postal 10 x 15, hasta A4.

Las obras serán desplegadas en: http://trenesyvagones.blogspot.com/

Favor de incluir su nombre y dirección de correos postal y email detrás de la obra.
Sin retorno.
Respuesta a los participantes.

Termina 31 diciembre de 2008

Enviar a
SAMUEL MONTALVETTI
Av. Rivadavia 2109 1 piso dto 3
-1034- C.A.Bs.As. Argentina

copia y pasa / copy and pass

TRAINS, TRIPS AND COACHES

This is a call from POSTAL ART on the topic of trains
and their associated matters, i.e. engines, coaches,
signs, routes, tickets, etc.

All technics will be welcome withing the following
sizes: 10 x 15 cm postal card size up to A4 sheets.

Works will be opened in: http://trenesyvagones.blogspot.com/

Please include name as well as Post Office address and
e-mail at the back of the work.

Works will not be returned. Responses are guaranteed
to every participant.
Ending December 31, 2008.

Please send to:
SAMUEL MONTALVETTI
Av. Rivadavia 2109 1 piso dto 3
-1034- C.A.Bs.As. Argentina

PARA VER OTRAS CONVOCATORIAS IR A
http://boek861.com





WHARTSCAPE 2008 (Thanks to Ric Royer for this Post)



> Im performing with Jackie Milad on thursday night at Whartscape. Look
> at that lineup! That Wham City really cooked up a good one.
>
> More here:
> http://www.whamcity.com/
> If you are not familiar with Wham City or the Whartscape, surf their
> website, it's a good surf. It's mostly music, but some
> performance/theatre/conceptual art mixed in. And check out attached
> poster, it's like the Beowulf of my dreams.
>
> SCHEDULE:
> Thursday Night at the Charles Theatre, 5:30 -12am
>
> MATMOS
> NAUTICAL ALMANAC
> ULTIMATE REALITY
> "ADVENTURES IN ILLEGAL ART" WITH MARK HOSLER OF NEGATIVLAND
> LEPRECHAUN CATERING
> TEETH MOUNTAIN
> BLUE LEADER
> BEN HERSEY
> RIC ROYER
> THE MISSOULA OBLONGATA
>
> FRIDAY NIGHT, JULY 18th
> - at 2640 SPACE, 2640 St. Paul St. 5PM - 11PM
> BEACH HOUSE
> JANA HUNTER
> GOLDEN AGE (FORMELY MORE DOGS)
> ARBOURETUM
> LESSER GONZALEZ ALVAREZ
> WHEATIE MATTIASICH
> SANTA DADS
> MATTEAH BAIM
> ANDY ABELOW
> EAGLE AGER
> A MURMERED TALE (A PLAY! STARTS AT 6PM)
>
> SATURDAY DAY, JULY 19th
> - Outside 131 West North Ave. NOON - 10PM
> OXES
> THANK YOU
> KILLER WHALES
> DEATHSET
> THE MAE SHI
> DDMMYYYY
> EYEBALL SKELETON
> BIRD NAMES
> ECSTATIC SUNSHINE
> LEXIE MOUNTAIN BOYS
> THE CREEPERS
> WZT HEARTS
> FOOD FOR ANIMALS
> DUFUS
> FACTS
> ED SCHRADER
> AIR WAVES
> BENNY STOOFY
> SMARTS
> KING CLOUD
>
> SATURDAY NIGHT, JULY 19th
> - at SONAR, 407 E. Saratoga St. 10PM - 2AM
>
> CELEBRATION
> VIDEO HIPPOS
> NUCLEAR POWER PANTS
> BLOOD BABY
> HUMAN HOST
> RED
> BLUE
> YELLOW
> GREEN
> WHITE
>
> SUNDAY DAY, JULY 20th
> - Outside 131 West North Ave. NOON - 10PM
> BLACK DICE
> PONYTAIL
> PARTS AND LABOR
> DOUBLE DAGGER
> GRAND BUFFET
> TREY TOLD 'EM (GREGG GILLIS & HEARTS OF DARKNESSES)
> DAN DEACON
> HEIGHT
> FUTURE ISLANDS
> CLUB LYFESTILES
> ADVENTURE
> WHITE WILLIAMS
> KYLE + MM + NARWALS
> EAR PWR
> THRUST LAB
> TEENAGE SOULS
> HEARTS OF DARKNESSES
> WITCH HAT
> JONES
> MOSS OF AURA
>
> SUNDAY NIGHT, JULY 20th
> - Annex Theater 10PM - 2AM
>
> CEX
> SECRET SURPRISE GUEST
> DJ DOG DICK
> SEWN LEATHER
> EGYPTRIXX & ALIAS
> TEENGIRL FANTASY
> NINJASONIK
> SMART GROWTH
> SHAMS
> MARK BROWN
> NEON COYOTE
>

OBJETUAL: Muestra de Arte de Performance / Martes 15 de Julio de 2008 / Sala de Proyectos, Museo de Arte Moderno / Santo Domingo, República Dominicana




Date: Sun, 13 Jul Subject: OBJETUAL: Muestra de Arte de Performance / Martes 15 de Julio de 2008 / Sala de Proyectos, Museo de Arte Moderno / Santo Domingo, República Dominicana

http://performancelogia.googlepages.com/objetual-santodomingo-2008.jpg


Arte-estudio les invita a
OBJETUAL: Muestra de Arte de Performance

Artistas:
Lina Aybar
Sayuri Guzman
Yokaira Marrero
Jochi Muñoz
Francis Taylor

Martes, 15 de Julio de 2008
7:30pm

Sala de Proyectos
Museo de Arte Moderno
Santo Domingo, República Dominicana

Mas información:
www.performancelogia.com/objetual


--
PERFORMANCELOGÍA
Todo sobre Arte de Performance y Performancistas

Recopilación, Publicación, Difusión e Intercambio
de Documentación sobre Arte de Performance y Performancistas

Web: www.performancelogia.com
Boletines: http://groups.google.com/group/performancelogia
Colaboraciones: performancelogia@gmail.com
Intercambios: Av. Urdaneta, Edificio Ipostel.
Apartado Postal: 5048. Caracas, Venezuela.

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